Transportation Investment Packages

Background

In fall 2015 through early 2016, Washington County conducted meetings and outreach with the public, stakeholders, Study Advisory Committee members, Health and Equity Workgroup members and city and agency staff. They provided input on transportation investments that the County should study to meet the economic health and quality of life in Washington County in the coming decades. Stakeholders and the public provided many transportation investment ideas for consideration across all modes of travel.

The Study team narrowed down these ideas and categorized them into three transportation investment packages for evaluation purposes. Each package includes investment choices for roadways, transit, bicycle, pedestrian, demand management, new technology and pricing. Each package varies in the type and magnitude of investments, to evaluate how well each addresses future transportation challenges. The results of this evaluation will help inform future decisions about transportation investments. This Study will not result in a plan, but will help leaders and the community think about options for the future.

The transportation investment packages include:

Package A – Current policies with enhanced transit investments and demand management strategies

Focuses on transit and demand management and assumes investments adopted in current plans for technology, bike and pedestrian facilities, local roadways and regional facilities.

Package B – Extending current policies with a focus on major roadway capacity expansion

Focuses on adding roadway capacity that is not currently in adopted financially constrained plans, but would be consistent with current policy direction, such as new arterials and widening of existing facilities. This option would help assess the effect of an expanded arterial network, access management and widening on Hwy 217 in addition to the other assumptions in Package A.

Package C – Beyond current policies with a focus on throughway capacity expansion

Focuses on adding additional throughway capacity that is not currently in adopted plans and would require changes to existing policies, such as roadway expansion in rural reserves and expansion of throughways beyond those proposed in regional plans. While Package B focuses on arterial expansion and limited throughway widening, Package C focuses on new and expanded throughways as investment priorities. The throughway focus is intended to direct traffic away from existing arterials and provide alternative access.

Overview of Transportation Investment Packages

Investments

A

B

C

Adopted Plans (pdf, 3.2 mb) (local Transportation System Plans and Regional Transportation Plan)

X

X

X

Enhanced Demand Management Strategies

X

X

X

Expanded Bus and High Capacity Transit Systems

X

X

X

Express Transit on Throughways

X

Complete Bike/Ped Network on Major Roads

X

X

X

New Bike Highways on Regional Trails

X

Enhanced On-street Bike/Ped

X

Connect and Widen Existing Arterials

X

New Arterials in Rural Areas

X

New Capacity on Throughways

X

X

Managed Lanes

X

New Interchange

X

In mid-2016 the Study team will evaluate how well the three Transportation Investment Packages support values that are important to the community. In late 2016, the public will have the opportunity to engage in a conversation about the study findings and trade-offs between investment options.

Click on the tabs below to learn about the transportation investments that will be evaluated.

Certain tools and policies can help reduce the number of vehicles on the road or to shift trips to less congested times of day.

Reducing trips collage

The Study will look at strategies to reduce vehicle trips, including:

  • New mixed-use areas with parking management (i.e., paid parking and limited parking hours areas)
  • Employer-sponsored trip reduction programs and transit incentives
  • Increased car, bike, and ride-sharing programs
  • Integrated mobility, real-time information, and mobility hubs
  • Increased telecommuting
  • Implement a road-user charge based on how many miles a person drives (as an alternative to the gas tax)
  • Turn some freeway lanes into toll-ways and/or “managed lanes” where drivers pay a charge to use a lane

Next

New technologies are being developed that are changing the way we travel, and can help improve safety, facilitate “sharing” of bicycles, cars, and other travel modes, and improve traffic flow.

Emerging technology collage

The Study will look at potential impacts of emerging technologies, including:

  • Increased efficiency due to emerging technology (such as driverless and connected vehicles and an increase in online shopping)
  • Communications upgrades and adaptive signals in key corridors countywide
  • Increased electrification of fleet and eco-friendly transportation alternatives
  • Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) upgrades on new roadways

Next

Biking and walking facilities—including sidewalks, bike lanes, neighborhood greenways, and regional trails—can help provide affordable and healthy transportation choices.

Biking and walking map
Dotted lines describe off-street regional trail network. Map indicates general alignments for study, for illustrative purposes only.

Biking and walking collage

The Study will look at ways to improve bicycling and walking, including:

  • Expand the on-street network, by providing protected bicycle and pedestrian facilities
  • Expand the off-street network, by investing in the regional trail network as bicycle express routes
  • Provide bike and pedestrian supportive amenities in urban areas, such as crossings, signals, and bike parking
  • Reduce travel speeds of arterials through downtowns and town centers

Next

Increased transit service can provide an affordable and reliable travel option to serve mixed-use areas, low-income households, and "last-mile" connections to employment areas and lower-density neighborhoods.

Increased transit conceptual drawing
Map indicates general alignments for study, for illustrative purposes only.

The Study will look at ways to improve travel by transit, including:

  • Expand the grid bus network and frequent bus service
  • Extend High Capacity Transit to Forest Grove and Sherwood
  • Extend High Capacity Transit along TV Hwy and Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy
  • Expand WES to all-day service
  • Add express services between major locations
  • Use managed lanes on throughways, supported by additional park & ride and community connector shuttles
  • Expand transit services to adjacent counties, as well as to growing residential and employment areas

Next

Moving goods to market via freight trucks is critical to a strong urban and rural economy. Investments in technology and infrastructure can help move freight more efficiently.

Freight collage

The Study will look at ways to improve movement of goods by truck, including:

  • Expand capacity on major roads as an alternative to freeway travel.
  • Construct freight ramp meter bypass lanes at key locations.
  • Expand capacity on throughways and give priority to freight.
  • Dedicate truck lanes on US 26, I-5, and new north-south limited access roadway with dedicated on-ramps at key locations.
  • Develop new freight consolidation facilities that improve access for Washington County goods.

Next

Major roads serve commercial, residential, mixed-use, employment, industrial and agricultural, areas within Washington County. Well-designed and connected roads can improve travel for drivers, cyclists, pedestrians, and transit users and support community plans.

Major roads conceptual drawing
Map indicates general alignments for study, for illustrative purposes only.

The Study will look at ways to improve travel on our major roads, including:

  • Connect existing arterials to make more direct travel between South Hillsboro, Cooper Mountain, and Sherwood
  • Widen Cornelius PassRoad between US 26 and US 30
  • Improve passing lanes on select rural roads for freight trucks and bicycles
  • Add arterial crossings of throughways at key locations
  • Improve access management along key section of TV Hwy and 99W
  • Realign Hwy 219 with Scholls Sherwood Road and tie into planned Southern Arterial

Next

Throughways carry goods and people over long distances and connect Washington County to other parts of the region. Investments in throughways can help provide an alternative to the use of other County roads.

Throughway enhancements conceptual drawing
Map indicates general alignments for study, for illustrative purposes only.

The Study will look at ways to improve travel on throughways, including:

  • Build a new connection to Columbia Blvd from Cornelius Pass Road
  • Build new north-south limited access route between US 26 and 99W that connects to the planned Southern arterial between 99W and I-5
  • Add a new interchange in/near Wilsonville to access I-5 and I-205
  • Widen US 26, I-5, and I-205 (8-lanes) with new lanes dedicated to high occupancy vehicles, trucks and transit
  • Widen Hwy 217 (6 lanes)
  • Upgrade connecting arterials